Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Tailgunnerdownunder
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Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 4:46 am

Any members with photographs or news relating to the Australian War Memorial please feel free to post here. :thumbsup:

Tailgunnerdownunder
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 5:06 am

Recently I had the opportunity to visit the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. Unfortunately like previous visits I never have enough time to see even half of it and this time again I only could manage a few hours. Whilst there I did manage to take some photo's until my camera ran out of power but at least it will provide a starting point for further additions down the track.
We call it a memorial but most other counties would call it a museum. Such an emotional place to be with so many amazing items on display. My few photo's only give a brief glimpse of what they have, the rest would take days to view properly. Many other items are in storage waiting for an opportunity to be displayed.
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 5:34 am

This is a boat that landed Australian troops onto the shores of Gallipoli on the 25th April 1915. It was retrieved after the war still in position on the beach. A tour guide was leading a group of people when I was there and mentioned that it ferried troops from a particular country town on that fateful morning. You can imagine my surprise when that country town was indeed mine. There it was complete with bullet holes and scrapes etc, so close you could touch it. Probably not a good idea.
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 5:45 am

What a great display. From the First World War showing a soldiers uniform and possessions from the time period. The amazing thing here is that the mud from the front line from the trench is still present on the uniform, webbing and boots after 100 years. Just simply amazing. :shock:
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Tailgunnerdownunder
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 5:58 am

They have a whole wing of the memorial dedicated to aircraft. Here are some of the aircraft they have on display. :thumbsup:
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 6:08 am

....
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 6:23 am

G for George Lancaster Bomber.

G for George is an Avro Lancaster Mk. I bomber, squadron code AR-G and serial number W4783, operated by No. 460 Squadron RAAF during World War II. It is now preserved at the Australian War Memorial (AWM), Canberra, Australia.

G-George flew 90[1][2] operational sorties over occupied Europe with 460 Squadron, and is the second most prolific surviving Lancaster, behind R5868 S for Sugar of No. 83 Squadron RAF/No. 463 Squadron RAAF/No. 467 Squadron RAAF (137 sorties). Most operational Lancasters were shot down before they had reached 20 sorties: of the 107,085 sorties by Lancasters despatched in bombing raids on Germany 2687 aircraft went missing[3] G-George has the added distinction of bringing home, alive, every crewman who flew aboard it.

Upon retirement from combat duty in 1944, G-George was flown to Australia by an all-RAAF crew of Bomber Command veterans, and played a major part in raising war bonds during a round-Australia publicity trip. Post war, it was left to decay in the open air at RAAF Base Fairbairn, before being moved to the AWM in the early 1950s.

In 2003, G-George returned to display at the AWM in the new ANZAC Hall after a five-year restoration program at the Treloar Technology Centre, which restored the aircraft as faithfully as possible to its wartime configuration.[4] It is displayed in conjunction with a sound and light show that attempts to convey something of the atmosphere of a World War II Bomber Command raid, and incorporates a German '88' flak gun and a Bf 109 fighter. The display is based on a sortie captained by Flying Officer "Cherry" Carter to Berlin on "Black Thursday" December 1943, so called because Bomber Command lost 50 of the 500 bombers detailed for the raid - more than half were lost in landing accidents due to bad weather.

G-George serves as a memorial to all Australians who flew with Bomber Command, and to the 1,018 dead of 460 Squadron.

The designation 'G-George' comes from the RAF phonetic alphabet in use at the time. Individual aircraft on a squadron were allocated a letter and would be referred to using the corresponding word from the phonetic alphabet. Many other RAF squadrons would also have had a G-George but with different aircraft bearing that designation as they were lost in action or otherwise.

(Information as supplied by Wikipedia)
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 6:39 am


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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 7:00 am

Messerschmitt Me-163.

Me 163B, Werknummer 191907 was part of JG 400, captured at Husum and was shipped to the RAE. It was allocated the RAF Air Ministry number of AM222 and was dispatched from Farnborough to No. 6 MU, RAF Brize Norton, on 8 August 1945. On 21 March 1946, it was recorded in the Census of No. 6 MU, and allocated to No. 76 MU (Wroughton) on 30 April 1946 for shipment to Australia. For many years this aircraft was displayed at RAAF Williams Point Cook, but in 1986, the Me 163 was transferred to The Australian War Memorial for refurbishment. It was stored at the AWM Treloar Technology Annex Mitchell, refurbished and reassembled, and was later put up for display together with a Messerschmitt Me 262A-2a, Werknummer 500200 (AM81).

(Information supplied by Wikipedia)
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 7:06 am


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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 7:25 am

Messerschmitt Me-262.

The Messerschmitt Me 262, nicknamed Schwalbe (German: "Swallow") in fighter versions, or Sturmvogel (German: "Storm Bird") in fighter-bomber versions, was the world's first operational jet-powered fighter aircraft. Design work started before World War II began, but problems with engines, metallurgy and top-level interference kept the aircraft from operational status with the Luftwaffe until mid-1944. The Me 262 was faster and more heavily armed than any Allied fighter, including the British jet-powered Gloster Meteor.[5] One of the most advanced aviation designs in operational use during World War II,[6] the Me 262's roles included light bomber, reconnaissance and experimental night fighter versions.

Me 262 pilots claimed a total of 542 Allied aircraft shot down,[7] although higher claims are sometimes made.[Note 1] The Allies countered its effectiveness in the air by attacking the aircraft on the ground and during takeoff and landing. Strategic materials shortages and design compromises on the Junkers Jumo 004 axial-flow turbojet engines led to reliability problems. Attacks by Allied forces on fuel supplies during the deteriorating late-war situation also reduced the effectiveness of the aircraft as a fighting force. Armament production within Germany was focused on more easily manufactured aircraft.[9] In the end, the Me 262 had a negligible impact on the course of the war as a result of its late introduction and the consequently small numbers put in operational service.[10]

While German use of the aircraft ended with the close of World War II, a small number were operated by the Czechoslovak Air Force until 1951. It also heavily influenced several designs, such as Sukhoi Su-9 (1946) and Nakajima Kikka. Captured Me 262s were studied and flight tested by the major powers, and ultimately influenced the designs of post-war aircraft such as the North American F-86 Sabre, MiG-15 and Boeing B-47 Stratojet.[6] Several aircraft survive on static display in museums, and there are several privately built flying reproductions that use modern General Electric J85 engines.

Me 262 A-2a W.Nr.500200 Black X 9K+XK, 2 Staffel./KG 51
Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia. Built at Regensburg in March 1945, same batch from which the Deutsches Museum White 3 was built. Flown by Fahnenjunker Oberfeldwebel Fröhlich and surrendered at Fassberg. It remains the only Me 262 left in existence wearing original (albeit worn, as seen in the picture) colours. Its markings show both the Unit signatures along with the Air Ministry colours applied at Farnborough, where it was allocated reference Air Min 81. Restoration was completed in 1985 and the aircraft was put up on display.[116] The Australian War Memorial's website states that the aircraft "is the only Me 262 bomber variant to survive, and is the only remaining Me 262 wearing its original paint".

(Information supplied by Wikipedia)
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 7:31 am


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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 7:48 am

A scary place indeed by oneself all alone for hours at a time and little to no chance to bail out if things turned sour :shock:
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 7:54 am

A few photo's for the helmet collector and the uniform guys :thumbsup:
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:04 am

Australian soldiers fought in many theatre of operations during WW2 against a number of Axis forces.

Rommel and the German Afrika Corps.....North Africa.
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:24 am

Australian troops were the Rats of Tobruk. They fought in Greece against the Germans including the 1st SS Liebstandarte Adolf Hitler and in the battle of Crete against the Fallschirmjager.
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:30 am

And the Japanese in New Guinea. Here is a Japanese tank captured during the Battle for Milne Bay.
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:33 am

...
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Dave_Holden » Sat Jan 04, 2020 3:28 pm

You have done it again Mark - another amazing post. Every one of those aircraft are fantastic to see. The Me 262 and 163 are incredibly rare aircraft. They used to have a 262 in Budapest but they sold it for profit - very sad as its now in a private collection. This is a great memorial museum to the Australian armed forces who have been involved in all major conflicts - great post Mark.

By the way how is the temperature down there?

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby muckaroon1960 » Sat Jan 04, 2020 5:32 pm

Fantastic work Mark. What an interesting place and I'd love to visit. Thank you for sharing this with the forum it is much appreciated :thumbsup:

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby The Devils Bank » Sat Jan 04, 2020 6:21 pm

Superb thread.

Very interesting and informative, a treat to view.

Some of the exhibits are super rare and the 262 in it's original colours is a pleasure to look at.

The Australian War Memorial is magnificent and well worth a visit, just a pity it's so far away..

Thanks for the great pictures :ymapplause:

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sun Jan 05, 2020 8:43 am

Thank you for the positive feedback guys. Hopefully Christopher will wake up to this thread and it will require two cups of coffee in the morning for him to get through it all :lol:

Regards Mark.

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Mar 28, 2020 5:52 am

I recently found several more photo's from my visit which I would like to share.
They are of a brilliant exhibit of a WW1 British Mk IV 'Female' Tank. One with a very interesting past.
I have included a link covering it's history and specifications.

Regards Mark.

http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C240438
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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Dave_Holden » Sat Mar 28, 2020 10:03 am

Fantastic thread Mark. I never knew that these tanks had a crew of 8. Must have been incredibly noisy, cramped not to say very, very dangerous to be assigned to these for active service. Great to see these memorials so far away - very important places indeed.

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sat Mar 28, 2020 9:34 pm

Dave_Holden wrote:Fantastic thread Mark. I never knew that these tanks had a crew of 8. Must have been incredibly noisy, cramped not to say very, very dangerous to be assigned to these for active service. Great to see these memorials so far away - very important places indeed.


Thanks Dave. Indeed neither did I realise how many operated inside one or what they looked like inside. I spent some time at this display to study just that. Also something else I didn't know was they had a 'Male' and 'Female ' term to describe the tank. Can anyone tell us why?
And no it's not because some were a 'bitch' to get started :lol:

Regards Mark

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Dave_Holden » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:41 pm

Cannon and machine guns - that's all I am going to say, I will let someone else guess :thumbsup:

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby muckaroon1960 » Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:54 pm

I remember reading a while ago there were tanks with 6 pounder guns (male) and machine guns (female).

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Re: Australian War Memorial photographs and information.

Postby Tailgunnerdownunder » Sun Mar 29, 2020 10:33 pm

The "Female" tank was a variation of the British heavy tank deployed during the First World War. It carried multiple machine guns instead of the mix of machine guns and cannons mounted on the "male" tank. Lieutenant-Colonel Ernest Swinton, who played a part in the development of the first British tank and who was co-creator of the term "tank" (originally a code word), is credited with inventing these gender-related terms, thinking that the best tank tactics would have the two types operating in consort.

The prototype, nicknamed "Mother", and the first production models of what would become referred to as the Mark I were designed to carry two six-pounder guns and three machine-guns. Swinton expressed the fear that tanks armed in such a way might be unable to protect themselves from attacks by large numbers of enemy infantry. In April 1916, it was therefore decided that half of the 150 tanks on order should be fitted with machine guns in place of the six-pounders. A new sponson was designed so that the tank could carry two Vickers machine guns, with their cooling jackets protected by armoured sleeves, on each side of the hull. Swinton's idea was that tanks should operate in pairs: a "destroyer" (Swinton's original proposed name was "Machine Gun Destroyer") and a "consort" or "man-killing" tank, so that the two gave mutual protection. He stated that he then assigned the names "male" and "female" respectively. The designation "male" applied to those armed with six-pounder guns, whereas the "female" was the tank equipped only with machine guns.

A consequence of these designations was that the prototype Mother was considered a "male" tank.

The design of the female sponson allowed only a very small door, which made escape from the vehicle extremely difficult. From the Mark II onwards, a new design was introduced that was smaller, incorporated Lewis or Hotchkiss guns, and allowed for much larger doors.

Both male and female tanks took part in the first tank action, on September 15, 1916, at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, part of the Somme Offensive on September 15, 1916.

In 1918 it was decided that tanks should be 'hermaphrodite', simultaneously male and female, carrying both heavy armament and lighter machine guns. For the World War I tanks, this was achieved by fitting them with one sponson of each type. A mixed ability armament of the heavy gun and multiple machine guns also became common practice on turreted designs, without sponsons. This has become the standard model for tank designs since World War I and since then the terms "male" and "female" have been disused.
(Information supplied by Wikipedia)

Regards Mark

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